The 2019 Chunkster Challenge

2019 Chunkster Challenge

When it comes to challenges, I’m so easy to convince and thanks to Jean at Howling Frog Books, I’ve decided to join the 2019 Chunkster Challenge!  This challenge is hosted by Becky at Becky’s Book Reviews.  While I’m hesitant to add another challenge, I have quite a few chunkster’s tabled for 2019 that it sort of makes sense to join.  See how I manage quite easily to argue myself into it? 😀

The rules for the 2019 Chunkster Challenge are somewhat complex so I’m setting them down here.  It’s all based on a point system:

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2019 Christian Greats Challenge

2019 Christian Greats Challenge

A very unexpected challenge popped up at Carol’s place, Journey and Destination, the 2019 Christian Greats Challenge, and after some mulling over, I’ve decided to join.  I have a few books that might fit these categories that I’m reading or want to read and it might help me get through them (Augustine’s City of God, I’m looking at YOU!)

The following are the categories and my choices:

The History of the Church Eusebius Paul Maier

1)  A Book on Early Church History

  • The History of the Church by Eusebius or
  • City of God by Saint Augustine or
  • On the Incarnation by Athanasius or 

Why?  I’ve always wanted to read Eusebius.

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The Deal-Me-In Challenge for 2019 is here!

Deal Me In Challenge Classical Carousel

Yay!  The Deal Me In Challenge is here again!  Many thanks to Jay at Bibliophilopolis for hosting this challenge which has helped me to read many more Short Stories, Essays, Poetry and Children’s Books than I ever would have without it.

The rules are simple.  Choose short stories to correspond to each card in a deck of cards. Then draw one card each week and read the story that corresponds.

What do you need for this challenge?

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52 Books in 52 Weeks in 2019

52 Books in 52 Weeks

 

I used to regularly participate in the 52 Books in 52 Weeks challenge.  It was one of my favourite challenges and was reasonably easy for me to accomplish.  Then life became busy and 52 books now seems almost impossible to read in a year.  But 2019 is a new year and I’m determined to make reading more of a priority.  So the 52 Books in 52 Weeks challenge is back on Classical Carousel!

For this challenge, all you have to commit to do is to read 52 books, 1 during each week of the year.  The rules are relatively broad and easy to accomplish:

  • The challenge will run from January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2019.
  • Our book weeks will begin on Sunday
  • Week one will begin on Tuesday, January 1st.
  • Participants may join at any time.
  • All forms of books are acceptable including e-books, audio books, etc.
  • Re-reads are acceptable as long as they are read after January 1, 2019.
  • Book may overlap other challenges
  • If you have a blog, create an entry post linking to this blog.
  • Sign up with Mr. Linky in the “I’m participating post” in the sidebar
  • You don’t have to have a blog to participate.  Post your weekly book in the comments section of each weekly post.
  • Mr. Linky will be added to the bottom of each of the weekly posts for you to link to reviews of your reads.

Already I have some books on my radar to read including Tom Jones, The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Moby Dick, David Copperfield, Kidnapped and The Grapes of Wrath.

I’m excited to add the 52 Books in 52 Weeks challenge to my Back to the Classics, and Newbery Award challenges for 2019!  What challenges are you going to participate in in the new year?

 

 

Newbery Reading Challenge 2019

A Newbery Reading Challenge for 2019!  What could be better?! This is a new challenge for me, a challenge to read Newbery Award & Honor Books and Caldecott Medal and Honor books.  I love children’s books and this is an opportunity to focus on some of these books for 2019.

Julie from Smiling Shelves is hosting the Newbery Reading Challenge for 2019 and the rules are as follows:

  • 3 points for a Newbery Medal Winner
  • 2 points for a Newbery Honor Book
  • 1 point for a Caldecott Medal or Honor Book

There are five different levels to the Newbery Reading Challenge but I’m going to aim for the easiest, L’Engle at 15-29 points.

Mother and Child Reading by Alfred Smith Carlton source Wikimedia Commona

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Back To The Classics Challenge 2019

Here it is again, the Back to the Classics Challenge where we are challenged to read a number of classic books during the year!  I’m very scared to attempt any challenges after the reading year I had in 2018, but I’m sloughing off my failures and having a very positive, sunny attitude towards my reading in 2019!  With that in mind, I’m going to join Karen at Books and Chocolate‘s Back to the Classics Challenge!  Here are the categories and possible book choices for them:

Categories & Books:

  1. 19th Century Classic: Kidnapped by Robert Louis Stevenson or The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo
  2. 20th Century Classic:  The Lord of the Flies by William Golding
  3. Classic by a Female Author:  The Mill on the Floss by George Eliot or Mary Barton by Elizabeth Gaskell
  4. Classic In Translation:  The Stranger by Albert Camus
  5. Classic Comedy:  Gargantua and Pantagruel by François Rabelais or The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman by Laurence Sterne
  6. Classic Tragedy: Troilus and Cressida by William Shakespeare
  7. A Very Long Classic:  Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
  8. Classic Novella:  One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch by Alexandr Solzhenitsyn
  9. Classic From The Americas:  Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  10. Classic From Africa, Asia or Oceania:  The Garden Party and Other Stories by Katherine Mansfield
  11. Classic From A Place You’ve Lived: Roughing It In The Bush (Canada) by Susanna Moodie
  12. Classic Play:  Ajax by Sophocles

The Magdalen Reading ~ Rogier van der Weyden (Public Domain) source Wikimedia Commons

While the books listed are not set in stone, I’m going to try to stick as closely to them as I can.  I think I’m most looking forward to the comedy category ….. I definitely need some comedic relief lately! 😉  I’m also excited about reading another Greek play and perhaps getting back into sync with my ancient Greek challenge, and I do need to read another Shakespeare to get me going on the Bard again.  So many classic books, so little time!

If you’d like to join this challenge too, just hop over to Books and Chocolate and sign up.  It’s truly one of the best challenges of the year!

Previous Back to the Classics challenges:

 

A Literary Christmas 2018

In the Bookcase is hosting A Literary Christmas challenge and since I’ve been so neglectful of many of my other challenges this year, I wanted to try to finish on a high note.  Therefore, I’m joining!

All I have to do is to make a list of Christmas books I’d like to read and then finish as many of them as I can on or before December 31, 2018.  I should have some time off this Christmas so I have high hopes of doing well with this challenge.  Plus, I can slot in some wonderful (shorter) children’s Christmas classics, which will make it a little easier on me.

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Deal Me In Challenge List 2015

Happy New Year all!  My first post for the year is a list of Short Stories, Essays, Poems and Children’s Books for my 2015 Deal Me In Challenge.

THE LIST:

Clubs – Short Stories
A –  Cabbages and Kings – O’Henry
2 – The Runaway – Chekhov
4 – Le Horla – de Maupassant
5 – The Tell-Tale Heart – Poe
8 – A Little Woman – Kafka
9 –  A Haunted House – Woolf
10 – The Birds – Chekhov
J –  The Yellow Wallpaper – Gilman
Q – The Eyes – Wharton
K –   Signs and Symbols – Nabakov
Spades – Essays
A – Milton – Williams
3 – A Midsummer Night’s Dream – Chesterton
6 – Hamlet : The Prince or the Poem – Lewis
7 –  Monsters and the Middle Ages – Chesterton
8 – The World of Tomorrow – E.B. White
9 – Discipline and Hope, Means as Ends – Berry
10 – Sense – Lewis
J – Sex, Economy, Freedom & Community – Berry
Q – Different Tastes in Literature – Lewis
K – Vulgarity – Chesterton
Diamonds – Poetry
2 –  Gesang Der Geister Über Den Wassern – Goethe
3 – The Morning of Life – Hugo
5 – A Lover’s Complaint – Shakespeare
6 – Resolution and Independence – Wordsworth
8 – Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night – Thomas
9 – Ode to a Grecian Urn – Keats
10 – Tears, Idle Tears – Tennyson
K – Phoenix and the Turtle – Shakespeare
Hearts – Children’s Classic
2 – Three Greek Children – Church
3 – The Mysterious Benedict Society – Stewart
5 – Journey from Peppermint Street – deJong
6 – The Tanglewood’s Secret – St. John
7 – The Wolves of Willoughy Chase – Aiken
9 – Sprig of Broom – Willard
10 – Teddy’s Button – LeFeuvre
J – The Book of Three – Alexander
Q – Tales from Chaucer – Farjeon
K – Beyond the Desert Gate – Ray (2)

Deal Me In Challenge 2015

Okay, only one more challenge ……. really ……….!  Jay at Bibliophilica is having his yearly Deal Me In challenge and it looks like such fun, I couldn’t resist.  I’ve been watching Dale @ Mirror With Clouds participate all last year, and Marianne gave me an idea with a twist for it that should work wonderfully!

The rules are:

What is the goal of the project?
To read 52 short stories in 2015 (that’s only one per week)
What do I need?
1) Access to at least fifty-two short stories (don’t own any short story collections or anthologies? See links to online resources below)
2) A deck of cards
3) An average of perhaps just thirty minutes of reading time each week
Where do I post* about my stories?
(*You don’t have to post about every single story, of course, but if you have something to say about the story you read any given week, your fellow participants would love to hear it.)
1) On your own blog or website if you have one (I will link to your post at the bottom of my weekly post. I currently plan to do my weekly post on Sundays)
2) if you don’t have a blog or website you may comment on my weekly post, sharing thoughts on your own story – or start one at WordPress or blogspot – it’s easy and free to create a basic blog.
How do I pick which stories to read?
(The 52 stories themselves are totally up to you.) Before you get start reading, come up with a roster of fifty-two stories (you can use any source) and assign each one to a playing card in a standard deck of cards. It can be fun to use different suits for different types of stories, but that is optional. Each “week,” (if you’re like me, you may occasionally fall a story or two behind) you draw a card at random from your deck and that is the story you will read. There are links to last year’s participants’ rosters hereif you want to see some examples.
What if I don’t have time to read a story every single week?
Try one of the challenge variations noted below, the Fortnight (or “payday” if you prefer) version is one story every two weeks or the “Full Moon Fever” version with just thirteen stories read or selected on seeing each full moon…
How do I sign up?
Leave a comment below with your URL and I will link you. My first wrap-up post of the year (I post weekly, usually Sunday night or Monday morning) will include links to any new Deal Me In posts and a list of the participants with links to their roster of stories.
What is the purpose?
To have FUN and to be exposed to new authors and stories and maybe get in the habit of reading a short story a week. Isn’t that enough? 🙂


Now I’ve decided to follow Marianne’s lead and adjust the challenge to work for my reading plans for the year.  Part of my plan for 2015 was to try to read more children’s classics, essays and poems for the year, so instead of reading all short stories, I’m going to split it into four categories:  Short Stories, Essays, Poems and Children’s Classics.  
I’m really looking forward to this challenge.  In the next day or so, I’ll post my list of titles corresponding to the playing card deck.  I’m not promising I’ll be able to read all 52 of them, but I’ll certainly do my best!