20 Books of Summer for 2020

20 Books of Summer
Oh wow, it’s here again:  The 20 Books of Summer hosted by 746 Books.  And I laugh!  Ha, ha!  And two questions spring to mind:

  1.  Do I really think I can finish 20 books this summer? and;
  2.  Knowing me, do I really think I can stick to a list?

Then I saw Ruth’s post pop up which is labelled: The 10 Books of Summer.  And I came up with a brilliant idea.  Why not choose 20 Books but only expect to read 10 of them?  That way I’ ll have flexibility with my list and perhaps finish the challenge.  Just call me Einstein!

20 Books of Summer

© Cleo @ Classical Carousel

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The Big Four by Agatha Christie

The Big Four Agatha ChristieThe Big Four: “I have met people who enjoy a channel crossing; men who can sit calmly in their deck chairs and, on arrival, wait until the boat is moored, then gather their belongings together without fuss and disembark.”

Detective: Hercule Poirot

Published: January 1927

Length: 282 pages

Setting: London, Southampton, Devon, Surrey, Paris, Hatton Chase (fictional), Worcestershire, Belgium, South Tyrol (Italy)

Returning from Argentina after an 18-month absence, Hasting finds his old friend, Detective Hercule Poirot ready to depart for South American himself. He has been summoned by a client, Abe Ryland, who is a powerful man and in urgent need of his services.  But when Poirot finds a dishevelled, emaciated man in his bedroom with no clue as to how he got there, his departure is delayed.  As the man mutters Poirot’s name, while writing the number 4, Hastings speculates on a crime syndicate named The Big Four, whereupon the man reveals the possible players:

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The Phoenix and the Turtle by William Shakespeare

The Phoenix and the Turtle

I drew The Phoenix and the Turtle, a poem by William Shakespeare, for my Deal Me In Challenge, and after reading it, I’m so confused.  Fortunately, I pulled up an article on it which said it is one of the more confusing poems in English literature, so I feel a little better.  But only a little.  Let’s see what I can discover about it ……

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The Wind In the Willows by Kenneth Grahame

The Wind in the Willows“The Mole had been working very hard all the morning, spring-cleaning his little home.”

Like many readers, I read The Wind in the Willows as a child and was completely charmed by the adventures of Ratty and Mole and Badger and Mr. Toad and the other creatures who populated Grahame’s captivating tale.  Yet like any children’s book read as an adult, you wonder if it will have the same effect now as then. Would I relate to its characters, be able to vividly imagine its setting, to become part of the story instead of simply experiencing it? Fortunately, I found time had diminished none of its magic. From the moment that Mole discovered the river and began “messing around in boats,” I was there. I could hear the fresh wind rushing through the reeds and the splash of the water as Mole fell out of the boat.  I could feel the warmth of Ratty’s snug house and the fear of Mole as he trekked through the Wild Woods.  And what became appreciated once again became familiar and what became familiar became loved.

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Ten Currently Reading Books That I Need To Finish

Ten Books on My Currently Reading

When I had more time to read, I used to have about 6 to 8 books going at the same time.  This was never a problem and I did like to be able to read sections of a books consistently with group reads keeping me on track.  But sometime in the last three years or so, it’s all gone wrong.  Suddenly, I wasn’t finishing books I started, yet I would still pick up new ones to begin.  Which, of course, has left with me with a number of books I’ve begun but never completed.  Not good.

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Classics Club Spin #23

 

Spinning dancer

With everything going on of late, instead of targeting specific books to read, I’ve preferred to let my reading tastes wander to what I feel like reading at a particular moment.  Which makes me wonder with great puzzlement, why I’m choosing to participate in the recent Classics Club Spin.  Perhaps it’s because I’ve hardly focussed at all on my list.  But it’s more likely peer pressure from all you other bloggers who have jumped right in.  So here I go!

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The Mad Gardener’s Song by Lewis Carroll

Sutterlin Handwriting

These crazy times seemed to be the perfect time to re-start my Deal Me In Challenge and perhaps not so surprisingly, my card-choice led me to a very crazy poem, The Mad Gardener’s Song.  Lewis Carroll is well-known for his zany poetry and stories and this one is no exception.  It also lines up with my activities and planned activities of late …. gardening.  Of course, there is no connection to the mad gardener and me.  Perish the thought!  I’m quite sane.  Really ….! 😂😜

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