The Iliad ~ Book V & Book VI

The Iliad Read-along

I’ve been having some computer problems but am still almost on track as the read continues.  I hope that you’re all enjoying it.  Once you become familiar with the characters, the interplay between and around them is fascinating.  In these next books, we learn more about Diomedes, are introduced to Hektor’s family and learn more about the ancient Greek worldview.  And, of course, the gods work towards fate often in confusing ways, as the story unfolds.

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The Iliad ~ Book III and Book IV

The Iliad Read-along

Book III

The Achaians advance across the plain and the Trojans move to meet them.  Alexandros (Paris) struts out to challenge any of the Argive leaders, yet when Menelaus, the husband of Helen, steps forward, in cowardice Alexandros/Paris shrinks back to disappear among the fighters.  Hektor, shamed by his brother’s behaviour, rebukes him firmly:

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Back To The Classics Challenge 2020

Back to the Classics Challenge

My goodness, I was starting to get nervous.  I’d participated in this challenge since the beginning of my blog, which means approximately 6 years.  I was worried that it wasn’t happening this year but Karen posted the sign-up post yesterday and I’m thrilled.  It’s one of my favourite challenges, even though I haven’t done splendidly with it the last couple of years.  However, this year is a new year and I will try again!

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The Iliad ~ Book I & Book II

The Iliad Read-along

Normally with my read-alongs, I post my summaries and comments at the end of the week of the scheduled read to allow people to absorb the work before they read what I have to say.  But this poem can be a little overwhelming on a first read with all its different names and unfamiliar customs, so I’m going to TRY and post as the beginning or middle of the scheduled section.  Hopefully my posts can help you navigate through it and perhaps add some understanding to assist you on your way.

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The Deal Me in Challenge 2020

Cardsharps Caravaggio

Cardsharps (1594) Caravaggio
~ Wikiart

The Deal Me In Challenge 2020 is here!  I completely failed at this challenge last year but it doesn’t mean that I can’t try again. And how can I miss its 10th Anniversary? Jay at Bibliophilopolis is hosting this amazing 10th challenge, where you choose 52 short stories for the year, each linked to a playing card, and then draw the cards each week to see what you’ll read.

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Russian Literature Challenge 2020

Russian Literature Challenge 2020

Well, I didn’t think this would be the first challenge I signed up for in 2020, but I was anticipating its announcement.  Keely at A Common Reader is hosting a Russian Literature Challenge for 2020.  Yay!  I signed up for her Ancient Greek Challenge in 2016 and it was a great success.  I can’t wait for the chance to read some more Russian Literature to add to that which I’ve already read.

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The Blue Carbuncle by Arthur Conan Doyle

Christmas StoriesThe Blue Carbuncle

Two days after Christmas, Watson calls on Sherlock Holmes only to find him scrutinizing an old battered hat.  Holmes reveals that Peterson, a commissionaire, saw a man with a goose over his shoulder being assaulted by some ruffians.  The man raised his cane to defend himself and broke a window behind him; when he saw Peterson running towards him, he hastily fled, leaving his hat and the goose behind.  Peterson sought Holmes for help finding the owner of these treasures, but the only physical clues they discover are a tag on the goose, reading, “For Mrs. Henry Baker” and the initials H.B. inscribed on the inside of the hat.

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The Night Before Christmas by Nikolai Gogol

Christmas StoriesDoes the title of this short Christmas story inspire visions of Jolly Ol’ Saint Nick, sugar plums, presents and little children?  Or perhaps you imagine the comfort of a good night’s sleep and the joy of Christmas morning?  Well, wipe those thoughts right out of your mind.  Gogol’s The Night Before Christmas is as far from the favourite poem of my childhood as I could imagine.  He tells of adultery, the devil, thievery and unrequited love in a way that’s rather odd but extremely amusing.  It’s certainly a different perspective on a very important evening.

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